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  1. It's nearly December, and many expat teachers are thinking about Christmas. Some of us have been thinking about it since September, shopping for the best flights. Others of us know we can't afford a 53-hour flight with 4 changes to get from here to "Home." And a few of us are in places where Christmas Day is barely a blip on the calendar and not recognized as a holiday. So, for those of us who will stay local -- what can be done? First, for those who don't have a school calendar that acknowledges Christmas, if at all possible: tak
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  2. https://teacherlink.teachingnomad.com/teaching-license?utm_source=ZohoCampaigns&utm_campaign=Introducing+online+Teaching+License+program+2_2017-06-22&utm_medium=email The TEACH-NOW group has paired with Arizona and Washington DC to offer a new program for educators to obtain a US teaching certification. Many US states have reciprocity, so a AZ or DC cert would allow a teacher to go to many other states in the US and, of course, overseas. From the blurb: The TEACH-NOW program provides a unique teaching model. Instead of enrolling in several different courses each semester
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  3. Text, text, TEXT! ProTIp: buy an iPhone. Why? iMessage can be used on any Apple device under the same AppleID. Thus, you can log and text from you MacBook, from your local iPhone, and pick up right where you left off when you land in your home country and turnoff that iPhone. So, why text? Most modern phones have cameras, and if it's a phone, it should text. People back home like to see random stuff on the street -- things that wouldn't make it into a weekly email/monthly letter -- the things that happen NOW. Be connected on a daily basis-- your grandmother would prob
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  4. A year later, his whereabouts are known, but it seems that Myanmar police are not pursuing him. http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/murdered-teachers-family-slam-cops-11463991
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  5. Hi all, Lovely new forum, thanks for starting it, I hope it goes well. I started teaching in an International School in Semarang, Indoneisa in 1996, and become hooked. A visit to Kiribati, Central Pacific to visit some schools there just confirmed that feeling. I have taught Cambridge and International Baccalaureate curricula and I think both are great. I have been an IB Workshop leader for about a dozen years, and presented in about 10 countries around Asia and Australia. Look forward to getting to know you all... Pak Liam
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  6. Learn to say McDonalds, KFC, Pizza Hut-- not because you'll want to eat there*, but because everyone will want to tell you about how they are an example of globalism because they started in the country in which you are living. In three Asian countries, I've been told repeatedly that all three chains began in the area and expanded worldwide. I asked a driver "Why Kentucky in KFC?" and he said "To make Americans buy it." * You may never, ever eat at KFC, McDonalds, or Pizza Hut when you are in your home country, but you'll probably find that you will as an expat teacher. WHY? Ther
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  7. Learn left, right, turn, stop, here, yes, and your address FIRST. Then you can go anywhere and always get home in a cab-- even when your phone dies. Turn on Closed Captions on your TV! You'll pick up many basic words very quickly -- the colloquial way to say: okay!, yes!, yes?, no!, no?, wait!, and what?, which are said ALL of the time. Learn the name of your country and state/ province/ area in the local language.
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  8. What you have posted are some great examples of learning. For me, I have been living in Costa Rica, a Spanish speaking country for a year. When I first arrived, I spoke 0 Spanish. Now, I can semi-confidently say that I am conversational in my Spanish. It has been a long road of learning and I still have much to learn but here are some things that I have found helpful: 1. Depending on your school situation, you may have locals working at your school. Even if they speak English, choose to interact with them in their native language. It is a safe atmosphere to learn because you are sur
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  9. I am happy to as well! I am slightly confused as to the website though. Do I pick a forum and reply to the ones that I would like to reply to? I work at Blue Valley School in San Jose. I will work to provide information about my experience once I get more used to this website
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  10. Jakarta International School. A teacher of 8 years experience with a Masters will start on around 55k, rising to above 70k after 7 years service. Teachers who have graduate credits above the Masters earn more. Retirement is another 10-12% above that. I am able to save around $US7000 a month and still have a nice lifestyle.
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  11. With the New Year, many international educators are going to start thinking about new places to teach. Other teachers who have never taught internationally before will start thinking about teaching internationally, and wondering where to do so. Location is so important – because your quality of life has a direct bearing on how your overall teaching experience will be. The truth is though that there can never be a definitive guide to international education spots. Where to teach to have the best experience is very fluid, and varies from year to year. That's why we were happy to see th
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  12. Hi Maz I taught in Saudi for 2 years and before that was in the UAE for 4 years. Id say it all depends on your city and school as to how it is e.g are you on a compound? Outside of a compound you will have to wear an abaya and may be asked to cover your hair especially in Riyadh, Jeddah is more liberal in that respect. I'd definitely say research the school and check out reviews or talk to teachers working there before making a decision. I know people who've taught there for years and others who only managed a few months. Is there anything in particular you'd like to ask?
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  13. East Carolina University has a wonderful program that is part of their East Asian Cohort. It is an EdD that is geared for professionals willing to spend two weeks in Bangkok each summer and then two semesters online. Each summer, the group meets at the Thai-Chinese International School for two weeks. The online work is challenging but very rewarding. I just finished my second term with the group and I have been very impressed with the professors, the program and the amount of individual attention I get from the teachers. The professors are very motivated to teach groups of teachers wanting
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  14. As international educators, it is often hard to find things overseas that we have at our fingertips in the USA. There are times when we desire a little touch of home to make our lives feel more connected to our roots. There are a few things that I have found that I like and that make me feel like I am missing very little when I am not in the USA. I post these in hopes that others will add to this list. 1. USTVNow.com - This is a paid service that allows you to watch full and unedited TV from the USA. You can get ABC, NBC, CBS and a ton of other stations. The cost is often high for some
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  15. The World Academy is an establishment that would not survive outside Saudi Arabia. Unfortunately having teaching experience means you have a heads up on how a school should be run. If you don't have experience it would probably suit you. The school is owned by a company who have no educational background and is leased to a educational management systems who employ very inexperienced management staff to run them. The management team (Principal and Vice Principal) at the school had less than 6 years teaching experience between them and had to cope with the owners who had no experience. Thu
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  16. You're welcome. It is one of the few that are full IB in Thailand, the others would be KIS, Concordian, Prem and UWC (Used to be Phuket International Day Academy). Bangkok is a great place to live, but to be fair, it's not really as cheap as you think to live as an expat. However, the package is good, so really it's not a problem.
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  17. Thank you for the review. I have friends that work at NIST and enjoy it. I think it is only one of the very few schools that are full IB in Thailand. Is that right? Bangkok is an amazing place to live and very cost effective. A little money here can go a long way and a good package should allow their teachers to save.
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  18. I like using Raja's Fashions. Raja and Bobby Raja's Fashions Address: 160 Sukhumvit Road, Khlong Toei, Bangkok 10110, Thailand Phone: +66 2 253 8379 Hours: Open today · 10:30AM–8PM Trip Advisor Reviews:https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g293916-d2083026-Reviews-Raja_s_Fashions-Bangkok.html website: http://www.rajasfashions.com/
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  19. As someone who has has to read resumes to decide on who to employ, I agree keep it short, 1 page or 2 pages is ok. Longer, honestly, I skip sections or bin them. The most important thing is the resume must be clear, I do not want to spend time trying to figure out the important details, i.e. dates started, dates finished, schools worked at, qualifications obtained. Forget buzz words etc, unless you have evidence to back it up. One million percent agree. And also please list your experiences and qualifications in reverse order. I want to see most recent first. Anoth
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  20. If you want to get away from the city for a little relaxation, try the little island of Koh Samed. It's about three hours south of Bangkok by bus and has lodging options for all budgets. There is 20 minute speed boat shuttle to the island or for a little less, you can take a slower economic option (the ferry). We stayed at a beach-side bungalow (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ao-Cho-Grand-View-Resort-Koh-Samed/120535931360461). Very nice accommodations (w/ wifi), phenomenal staff, fantastic view of the beach right outside our bungalow and breakfast each morning. Bring a book to read whil
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  21. Hi, Ihave been teaching EFL, ESL, and also in High Schools for about 20 years English was my fisrt language, Spanish my second, Portuguese my third and I speak a little German, I would like to know how much would I need to invest if I want to teach EFL or ESL in Korea Thank you....
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  22. Hi from Phuket! I'm David; been teaching in Thailand for over 20 years and founded the TEFL Teacher Training Language School, Phuket in late 2000. Phuket Paradise and the entire region is still in need of serious Education! For any advice and information, please ask. Regards, David
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  23. Thanks, Michael. Our school, KICS is a CIS accredited and the first and only IB school in Sudan. More about it in this website: www.kics.sd.
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  24. Hi, I'm a 4th grade teacher in Mesa, Arizona, USA. I taught for 2 years at an international school in Hong Kong from 2001-2003, and am thinking about teaching overseas again. I have a fiancé and a 3-year-old son that I would be bringing with me. I'm excited to learn more... it would be so wonderful to give my son the opportunity to live, learn, and travel among other cultures!
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  26. Hello From Michigan: I'm Esther Combs and I am looking forward to embarking on my next adventure of obtaining a doctoral degree from East Carolina University. This opportunity is such a blessing. Excited to learn and grow with a very diverse group of professionals.
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  27. Hi folks, I'm Lori. Originally from North Carolina, now living in Taiwan. I look forward to meeting everyone in a few weeks!
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  28. Hi All, Welcome to Thailand! I am Kristin Halligan and Thailand is my adopted home. I have lived here for about 13 years spreading my time between the Big Mango, Issaan, and Chiang Rai. I actually live pretty close to the venue where we will be studying so I can point you in the right direction of some delicious Thai food or things to do. I speak Thai reasonably well. I look forward to meeting you all and embarking on this educational adventure!
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  29. Welcome Ester. I am happy to meet you! I'm Michael. I am from New York but my sister lived in the UP of Michigan for several years and enjoyed it. I'm looking forward to meeting you in a few weeks. You should now have permission to see the special ECU forums at the bottom. If you have any problems, let me know!
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  30. These are great Tips!!! Thanks! Hadn't thought about the curriculum!
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  31. Nothing in life is perfect – and this is just as true about international teaching as it is for anything else. While you can have a great experience, there are also some landmines that you want to avoid. With that in mind, we spent some time talking to experienced international educators and asked them what were the most common problems they or other educators they knew have faced. Knowing about these challenges ahead of time can help you avoid them and increase your chances of having a great experience. · Issues with alcohol. In many countries, socializing for the English s
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  32. Very true!!! But once you get bitten by international teaching bug, you are hooked!!!
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  33. This company does a really good job at trying to pair teachers with schools. We have gotten quite a few leads with them. They seem to be very proactive and emails are always answered really fast. The ladies running this are keeping up with their site and seem to be in touch with most of the schools they represent. This is one group that I would recommend if you are looking for international teaching jobs. https://www.trueteaching.com/
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  34. Hi, I am currently working in a Saigon International School as a teacher. I am also a member of the facebook group. Not currently looking for work but I am curious about the International School scene here.
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  35. After teaching in Australia for many years, I took the biggest gamble of my life and leapt head first into the amazing world of international teaching. Not only have I been to fabulous places but the opportunities for incredible teaching experiences and developing long lasting friendship over the last 10 years confirmed my belief that the risk, angst and self-doubt was all worth it.
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  36. Far too many people think it's really easy to get hired by a school to teach English abroad. They assume they can go where they want to live, and find work with the snap of a finger. Anyone who has taught abroad sees this every August and January. Fresh-faced young people turn up and start handing out resumes to every school in town. A month later, they've either gone home or are working at the local Irish bar. Maybe if they are really lucky, they end up teaching part-time at a low-rated school for barely any money. The truth is that if you want to get a decent teaching
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  37. Welcome to the International Educators website. This is a totally free site and allows members to talk about international schools, jobs fairs, teaching practices, etc. without massive moderation that exists on other sites.
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